How to Get Married in Florida

So, you've planned a lovely wedding, stayed within your budget, and and now you're ready for the actual getting married part of the process. But how? Don't worry, Tulle Nation, I've got you taken care of. Each week this year, I'll be sharing all the information you need to know to get married in one state in the United States. Today, Florida!

So, you've planned a lovely wedding, stayed within your budget, and and now you're ready for the actual getting married part of the process. But how? Don't worry, Tulle Nation, I've got you taken care of. Each week this year, I'll be sharing all the information you need to know to get married in one state in the United States. Today, Florida!

How to Get Married in Florida

Application, ID, and Residency Requirement: Every marriage license is issued by a county court judge or clerk of the circuit court under his or her hand and seal. Marriage licenses are issued by counties and you can apply for your license at any county clerk's. Click Here for Clerk of the Court contact information by county. You can get married in any county in Florida, regardless of where you obtained your marriage license.

To obtain a marriage license you need: a picture ID such as a driver’s license, state ID card, or valid passport; both parties will also have to provide their Social Security numbers, but do not need to provide their Social Security Cards. Both the bride and groom must appear in person at the time of applying.

Proxy weddinga are not allowed in Florida. Blood tests are not required. Do not have to be a resident of Florida. There is no waiting period for Florida residents who have both completed a state sanctioned marriage preparation course within the last 12 months. There is a three-day waiting period for Florida residents who have not taken the course.

Under 18: If an individual is under 18 years of age, but older than 16 years of age, a marriage license can be obtained with parental consent. If a parent has sole custody or the other parent is dead, the permission of one parent is sufficient. If a person is under the age of 16, the marriage license has to be issued by a county judge, with or without parental permission. If a minor's parents are both deceased and there is not an appointed guardian, he/she may apply for a marriage license.

A minor who has been previously married may also apply for a license. A minor who swears that they have a child or are expecting a baby, can apply for a license if the pregnancy has been verfied by a written statement from a licensed physician. A county court judge may at his/her discretion issue or not issue a license for them to marry.

How Much a Marriage License Cost?: $93.50 – cash only. Couples who have completed a state-sanctioned marriage preparation course within the past 12 months are entitled to a discount of $32.50. The provider of the class must be listed with the Clerks office.

Officiants: All regularly ordained ministers of the gospel or elders in communion with some church, or other ordained clergy, and all judicial officers, including retired judicial officers, clerks of the circuit courts, and notaries public of this state may solemnize the rights of matrimonial contract, under the regulations prescribed by law.

If you would like to be able to perform marriage ceremonies in the state of Florida, you can do so by becoming a notary public.

Valid: Marriage license is valid for 60 days after issuance. You must perform the ceremony of marriage before this 60 days has expired.

Equality Rights: Same-sex marriage is legal in Florida.

Name Change: Getting a marriage license with your new name on it does not mean your name has automatically changed.

It is very important that you verify all information with your local marriage license office or county clerk before making any wedding or travel plans.

For More Information:

Department of Children and Families
Division of Vital Statistics
P. O. Box 210
Jacksonville, FL 32231-0042
904-359-6955

Please Note: State and county marriage license requirements often change. The above information is for guidance only and should not be regarded as legal advice.

How many of you are getting married in Florida?

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