How to Get Married in Kansas

So, you've planned a lovely wedding, stayed within your budget, and and now you're ready for the actual getting married part of the process. But how? Don't worry, Tulle Nation, I've got you taken care of. Each week this year, I'll be sharing all the information you need to know to get married in one state in the United States. Today, Kansas!

So, you've planned a lovely wedding, stayed within your budget, and and now you're ready for the actual getting married part of the process. But how? Don't worry, Tulle Nation, I've got you taken care of. Each week this year, I'll be sharing all the information you need to know to get married in one state in the United States. Today, Kansas!

How to Get Married in Kansas

Application, ID, and Residency Requirement: A license can be obtained at a district court clerk's office. Only one applicant needs to be present to turn in the application, but the applicant must know all the necessary information to complete the form for both partners. There is a 3 day wait after filing the application. Applicants must be at least 18 years of age to apply without parental consent. Blood tests are not required. The ceremony must be in the state of Kansas.

A photo ID (such as a driver's license and a Social Security card) are necessary to obtain a marriage license in Kansas. If applicants have been previously married, they must provide the dates the marriages ended. Applicants who have been divorced within 30 days prior to submitting the marriage application have to wait until more than 30 days have passed to obtain a marriage license.

Under 18: The legal age to marry in Kansas is 18. Exceptions may be made for 16- and 17-year-olds if permission is granted from both parents or legal guardians. In the case of a minor without parents or guardians, a judge can grant permission to marry. A 15-year-old in Kansas must receive permission to marry from a district court judge.

How Much a Marriage License Cost?: A marriage license costs $59 in Kansas (there may be additional processing fees). License must be paid for with exact change.

Officiants: Judges and ordained ministers or religious leaders can officiate weddings in Kansas. Two witnesses ages 18 or older must be present at the ceremony. The Kansas marriage code also allows two partners to marry themselves, stating the following: "The two parties themselves, by mutual declarations that they take each other as husband and wife, in accordance with the customs, rules and regulations of any religious society, denomination or sect to which either of the parties belong, may be married without an authorized officiating person."

Valid: The license expires six months after the date of issuance.

Equality Rights: Same-sex marriage is legal in Kansas.

Common Law Marriage: Kansas allows common-law marriages. There is no time requirement or cohabitation minimum for common-law marriages in Kansas. According to the marriage laws, "A common-law marriage will be recognized in Kansas if the couple considers themselves to be married and publicly holds themselves out to be married and if they are legally eligible to marry. No minimum period of cohabitation is required."

Name Change: Getting a marriage license with your new name on it does not mean your name has automatically changed.

It is very important that you verify all information with your local marriage license office or county clerk before making any wedding or travel plans.

For more information obtaining a marriage license in Kansas click here.

Please Note: State and county marriage license requirements often change. The above information is for guidance only and should not be regarded as legal advice.

How many of you are getting married in Kansas?

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